Optimus Learning School




OPTIMUS LEARNING SCHOOL

HOMESCHOOL

We work together with local charter schools to provide classes for homeschooled students. Each of these programs requires a background check on our instructors (in addition to the background check that Optimus performs upon hiring). We are catering to students’ needs from math, reading, writing and homework help. However, we also offer help in enrichment classes such as computer coding, piano, violin, Korean, or Chinese. Our homeschooling program offers three of the following options:

If the student is already enrolled in a charter school, this option allows them to bring materials such as, textbooks and everything they received from the school, to Optimus. Together, we will teach and students will learn from those materials covering all California’s Standards.

If the student is enrolled in a charter school but he/she doesn’t have any provided materials, this option allows us to work with the student to come up with an academic plan. We will go over different course materials and textbooks and choose them together. Regardless of the materials, we assure you that students will meet standards by giving them the California State Standard Test ourselves.

This option allows students to pick and focus on their particular subject of interest. It may be English or Math, or they can simply focus on computer coding.

This option allows students to pick courses that follow general education requirements taught in high school.

ELA: 9th/10th/11th/12th
Math: Algebra 1/ Algebra 2/ Geometry/ Pre Calculus

** These courses can be taken by all high school students.
***Students must be enrolled at Inspire Charter School to receive high school credit for these courses.

We are currently accepting students from the following homeschool/charter school programs:

However, if the student is enrolled in a different charter school other than the ones listed, please contact us at info@optimuslearningschool.com for more information about what classes we may be able to provide your child.


Registration Procedure

If you are currently part of one of the charter schools listed above, you may start by contacting us directly to choose which class option fits best for your child. Then, you will need to get your class request approved by the school before attending so that we may bill them accordingly. Once you've received approval, you can begin taking class and we will take care of the billing.
If your charter school is NOT on the list above, you can contact your charter school and request that Optimus Learning School become a vendor. Optimus will go through the process of becoming a vendor, and you will then be able to follow procedure A for listed charter schools.
For students who are being homeschooled that are NOT involved in a charter school program, you may contact us directly. Regular tuition rates will apply.

Assessment Test

The student takes a test that is modeled after the California State Test (CST) to ensure proper placement in Optimus courses. The student’s school grades and standardized test results should be provided for our database.

For students in Pre-K, Kindergarten, or 1st grade, the assessment is done face to face with a teacher who will check English and math skills (such as phonics, letter and word recognition, sight words, pronunciation, counting, addition and subtraction, etc.). The assessment takes approximately 30-45 minutes and is followed by 10-15 minutes of feedback from the teacher to the parent. An assessment for students in these grades is $50. If you decide to sign up for a class or Homeschool program afterwards, your assessment fee will be credited towards your first tuition payment.

There are two separate computerized assessment tests available for students in or above 2nd grade, one for Math and one for Language Arts. Each test takes approximately 1 ½ to 2 hours to complete. Tests are $30 for one or $50 to take both tests. If you decide to sign up for a class or the homeschool program afterwards, your assessment fees will be credited towards your first tuition payment.


DOJ & FBI Clearance

Prior to hiring any new employees, Optimus requires that a background check be performed on the applicant. This means that the applicant must get fingerprinted at a government-approved fingerprinting facility, which will allow Optimus access to the applicant’s criminal history. Providing a safe environment for our students is of utmost concern for Optimus and is taken into account when making each and every hiring decision.

For more information, please read our blog.


Schedule and Tuition

K-3rd Schedule I

Schedule Monday Wednesday
9:00-10:00 Math Math
10:00-11:00 Book Club Writing
11:00-12:00 Science History

K-3rd Schedule II

Schedule Monday Wednesday Friday
9:00-10:00 Math Math Coding
10:00-11:00 Book Club Writing Art
11:00-12:00 Science History Chinese / Korean / STEM Building

4th-6th Schedule I

Schedule Monday Wednesday
9:00-10:00 Math Math
10:00-11:00 Book Club Writing
11:00-12:00 Science History

4th-6th Schedule II

Schedule Monday Wednesday Friday
9:00-10:00 Math Math Coding
10:00-11:00 Book Club Writing Art
11:00-12:00 Science History Chinese / Korean / Module Electronics

7th-8th Schedule I

Schedule Tuesday Thursday
9:00-10:00 Math Math
10:00-11:00 Book Club Writing
11:00-12:00 Science History

7th-8th Schedule II

Schedule Tuesday Thursday Friday
9:00-10:00 Math Math Coding
10:00-11:00 Book Club Writing Art
11:00-12:00 Science History Chinese / Korean / Robotics

Monthly Tuition (Limited to 10 students/class)

1 Day/Week 2 Days/Week 3 Days/Week
$150 $225 $300

Homeschool Programs

Textbooks By Grade Level

If you would like to see the textbooks that each class will use for each grade level, please click here.

Book Club

Our lower elementary-level book clubs foster an enjoyment of reading while strengthening students’ reading skills. At this beginning level, we focus on vocabulary and understanding. Students often perform an activity in class that is connected to what they read in order to help them better understand the book or its characters. Students will also get feedback on their comprehension and vocabulary homework in class.

Picture Books

Through the use of popular picture books by award-winning authors and illustrators, students are exposed to a wide variety of fun and interesting characters getting themselves in and out of all kinds of situations. The pictures help to feed their imaginations and take them to new places.

Aesop’s Fables Short Stories

These stories are a little longer than traditional picture books and encourage students to work up to longer texts. They continue with the same kinds of great lessons and morals learned in our earlier Aesop’s Fables Picture Books.

Our upper elementary-level book clubs increase reading comprehension, broaden students' vocabulary, and help our students begin a life-long habit of reading. Students read interesting novels and, in addition to understanding what is happening in each book, student begin to look at why things happen. The whole class will engage in discussions about the novel and its characters while reviewing comprehension and vocabulary homework.

Classic Short Stories

The work of authors such as the Grimm Brothers and Hans Christen Andersen is most notable remembered through Disney’s classic animated films. At Optimus, we want our students to know where all of these fantastic stores originated from. We have created adaptations that are appropriate for younger students, so parents need not worry about the darker elements of the original classics. Through these stories, our students will not only improve their academic skills, but they’ll also have fun making comparisons between the original stories and some of their favorite Disney movies!

Biographies

In these upper elementary grades, learning how to navigate non-fiction text can be just as important as the comprehension skills learned from reading fiction works. But, non-fiction writing can often be boring for students. We created the Biography reading option especially for those students. At this age, students can benefit greatly from familiarizing themselves with some of the most popular figures in history. We’ve chosen Americans with some very interesting and impressive back stories.

Greek and Roman Mythology

Not only do we strive to improve reading comprehension in our students, but we also encourage the development of their imaginations. Through one of our most unique classes yet, we offer Greek and Roman mythology that will help them explore the ancien stories of Greek and Roman gods and goddesses and the vivid places they lived.

Fiction Chapter Books

Once students have built up the necessary foundations by reading selections curated by our teachers and carefully chosen for their merit, students are then encouraged to begin making their own choices about which novels to read in a group Book Club class. The class discusses a variety of comprehension questions about what they read and add to their vocabulary.

Our junior high and high school students often read the classics of the Western canon, including many challenging novels. Junior high students get prepared for the level of vocabulary and comprehension that will be expected of them in high school, while high school students focus on SAT level vocabulary and comprehension skills. There is also a shift in focus to more critical thinking questions. Students complete comprehension and vocabulary homework and are held to a high standard.

Writing

Lower elementary students begin with writing fact-based information about themselves and subjects that they are familiar with. They also write many creative stories that help them to add detail and develop a fondness for writing. The majority of our focus at this level is towards sentence structure, correct use of vocabulary, proper punctuation, and overall clarity.

Little Writers Club

We want to encourage students to begin telling their stories through writing. In this class, students will work on multiple sentence responses, working towards correct spelling, grammar, and simple punctuation. Students will also start getting more detailed teacher feedback.

Junior Writing Club Beginner

This class focuses on easy-to-understand grammar lessons with related essays that both review the previous weeks’ grammar lessons and work with the current week’s lesson. These writing assignments then receive feedback on the student’s proper use of grammar, mechanics, and overall structure.

Junior Writing Club Intermediate

Our intermediate level writing class is a pivotal point at which students start learning how to incorporate what they’ve learned into their essays. They begin by reading a non-fiction passage, from which they will learn some valuable vocabulary words. Then, they write an essay on a related prompt and receive feedback on their work. At this level, we also focus on student content and creativity. Students complete a final draft for homework.

Junior Writing Club Advanced

After completing the intermediate level, students move on to non-fiction passages with more difficult vocabulary words in them. Again, student content and creativity are looked at, as well as the amount of detail that is used and how well the writing structure flows from one idea to the next. Students receive teacher feedback on their rough drafts. Students complete a final draft for homework.

Students in upper elementary grades will continue writing creative stories and will also begin writing expository essays to introduce them to the idea of explaining in greater detail. These students work on using more complex sentence structures and more varied vocabulary.

Middle school students will prepare for the rigors of high school writing by being introduced to the more formal writing structure that will be expected of them in high school. They will also experience the full writing process, with each step being outlined and explained so that students understand the importance of an organized writing process. Grammar, punctuation, and word choice will still be a large focus in order to make sure students are strong in these areas before entering high school.

Grammar Club

This course goes over a total of 24 grammar lessons with everything from parts of speech to sentence types. At the end of each section (approximately every 4 weeks), students are given an in-class quiz to check their understanding of the grammar concepts they have been learning. Students will also write one essay per week that will help them practice and be mindful of that week’s grammar concept. They will receive teacher feedback on their rough drafts and will complete a final draft for homework.

Writing Styles Composition

In preparation for middle school and high school essay writing, it is important to review and preview the different writing styles students encounter and will be asked to write in school. We will be going over the 4 main types and will spend multiple class sessions discovering more about them, seeing examples of them, and writing some of our own. Rough drafts will be written outside of class and will be edited by peers and the teacher in class.

Critical Thinkers’ Writing Club

Here we return to the practice of incorporating what we’ve learned from a non-fiction passage into our writing. However, the focus here moves from simply writing a short response to paying more attention to the prewriting process (i.e., brainstorming, outlining, etc.) and writing true essays. Rough drafts will be started in class and finished at home. They will receive teacher feedback the following week and will be expected to complete a final draft for homework.

Current Events Writing Club

Each week, students will read about a current event (local or global) to help improve their reading skills and give them a starting point for their multi-paragraph essays. They will still be expected to use prewriting techniques to organize their writing, but they will work more independently on that part. Teacher feedback will include suggestions to improve writing beyond simply correcting errors in grammar, mechanics, or structure.

At this level, we focus on the various essay types used in high school classes. These types include expository, persuasive/argumentative, and analytical essays. Each new essay type is discussed and modeled before students begin brainstorming their responses to the topic, which allows students to have a clearer idea of the goal and see a good example. Students receive personal feedback on their writing and individualized coaching on the writing process. Students may also sign up for a writing class specific to SAT study.

In this creative writing class, students will begin working on pieces that require them to use their imagination. Although inspiration will be the main determinant of what students write about each week, students will also be guided by themes and specific writing exercises to help keep their creativity flowing. Peer evaluation and class discussions of each student’s work will play a major role in this class. In many cases, stories completed in this class will be eligible for entry into various writing competitions for students who are looking for an extra challenge.

Math

We cover the technical skills needed to evaluate math questions using the four basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The difficulty increases as we introduce new kinds of numbers and notations. In addition to teaching the students how to perform more complex operations in class and working through examples from previous homework, we correct misconceptions and improve their comprehension of the material continuously.

We work on textual mathematics questions that employ technical skills and problem solving strategies. We will work with probability, geometric figures, and finding unknown values. Word problems are analyzed in class, and students are taught how to interpret text and convert it into mathematical equations that they are already familiar with solving. They are taught to use a process that makes sense out of each question and breaks them up into easier steps.

At this level, we focus on the fundamentals of algebraic relationships of equations, inequalities, graphs, and functions. Courses include Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1, and Geometry. Students will use algebraic operations to find solutions and, later, how to impose algebraic concepts on more complex questions. This will allow them to learn a more logical approach to problem solving.

Thsese classes involve a more rigorous manipulation, analysis, and understanding of functions and their graphs. Courses include Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, Statistics, and Calculus. Students are taught functions combining polynomials and trigonometry as well as mathematical analysis for graphing complex equations. In Calculus, they are taught the fundamentals of using the derivative of an integration that is used in application problems.

Science

The focus of each class will vary based on the students’ level. We get students thinking about how and why things work the way they do, how technology and products have changed over time, or what might happen in a certain experiment. Students will focus on asking scientific questions and defining problems, developing and using models, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data, using mathematics and computational thinking, constructing explanations and designing solutions, engaging in argument from evidence, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.

• From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
• Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
• Earth’s Place in the Universe
• Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer

• Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
• Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
• Earth’s Place in the Universe
• Earth’s Systems
• Matter and its Interactions
• Engineering Design

• From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
• Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
• Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
• Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
• Earth’s Systems
• Earth and Human Activity
• Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
• Engineering Design

• From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
• Earth’s Place in the Universe
• Earth’s Systems
• Earth and Human Activity
• Energy
• Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
• Engineering Design

• From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
• Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
• Earth’s Place in the Universe
• Earth’s Systems
• Earth and Human Activity
• Matter and Its Interactions
• Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
• Energy
• Engineering Design

• From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
• Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
• Earth’s Systems
• Earth and Human Activity
• Energy
• Engineering Design

• From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
• Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
• Earth’s Systems
• Earth and Human Activity
• Matter and its Interactions
• Engineering Design.

• Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
• Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
• Earth’s Place in the Universe
• Earth and Human Activity
• Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions.

History

Students in grade one continue a more detailed treatment of the broad concepts of rights and responsibilities in the contemporary world. The classroom serves as a microcosm of society in which decisions are made with respect for individual responsibility, for other people, and for the rules by which we all must live: fair play, good sportsmanship, and respect for the rights and opinions of others. Students examine the geographic and economic aspects of life in their own neighborhoods and compare them to those of people long ago. Students explore the varied backgrounds of American citizens and learn about the symbols, icons, and songs that reflect our common heritage.

Students in grade two explore the lives of actual people who make a difference in their everyday lives and learn the stories of extraordinary people from history whose achievements have touched them, directly or indirectly. The study of contemporary people who supply goods and services aids in understanding the complex interdependence in our free-market system.

Students in grade three learn more about our connections to the past and the ways in which particularly local, but also regional and national, government and traditions have developed and left their marks on current society, providing common memories. Emphasis is on the physical and cultural landscape of California, including the study of American Indians, the subsequent arrival of immigrants, and the impact they have had in forming the character of our contemporary society.

Students learn the story of their home state, unique in American history in terms of its vast and varied geography, its many waves of immigration beginning with preColumbian societies, its continuous diversity, economic energy, and rapid growth. In addition to the specific treatment of milestones in California history, students examine the state in the context of the rest of the nation, with an emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the relationship between state and federal government.

Students in grade five study the development of the nation up to 1850, with an emphasis on the people who were already here, when and from where others arrived, and why they came. Students learn about the colonial government founded on Judeo-Christian principles, the ideals of the Enlightenment, and the English traditions of self-government. They recognize that ours is a nation that has a constitution that derives its power from the people, that has gone through a revolution, that once sanctioned slavery, that experienced conflict over land with the original inhabitants, and that experienced a westward movement that took its people across the continent. Studying the cause, course, and consequences of the early explorations through the War for Independence and western expansion is central to students’ fundamental understanding of how the principles of the American republic form the basis of a pluralistic society in which individual rights are secured.

Students in grade six expand their understanding of history by studying the people and events that ushered in the dawn of the major Western and non-Western ancient civilizations. Geography is of special significance in the development of the human story. Continued emphasis is placed on the everyday lives, problems, and accomplishments of people, their role in developing social, economic, and political structures, as well as in establishing and spreading ideas that helped transform the world forever. Students develop higher levels of critical thinking by considering why civilizations developed where and when they did, why they became dominant, and why they declined. Students analyze the interactions among the various cultures, emphasizing their enduring contributions and the link, despite time, between the contemporary and ancient worlds.

Students in grade seven study the social, cultural, and technological changes that occurred in Europe, Africa, and Asia in the years A.D. 500–1789. After reviewing the ancient world and the ways in which archaeologists and historians uncover the past, students study the history and geography of great civilizations that were developing concurrently throughout the world during medieval and early modern times. They examine the growing economic interaction among civilizations as well as the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and commodities. They learn about the resulting growth of Enlightenment philosophy and the new examination of the concepts of reason and authority, the natural rights of human beings and the divine right of kings, experimentalism in science, and the dogma of belief. Finally, students assess the political forces let loose by the Enlightenment, particularly the rise of democratic ideas, and they learn about the continuing influence of these ideas in the world today.

Students in grade eight study the ideas, issues, and events from the framing of the Constitution up to World War I, with an emphasis on America’s role in the war. After reviewing the development of America’s democratic institutions founded on the Judeo-Christian heritage and English parliamentary traditions, particularly the shaping of the Constitution, students trace the development of American politics, society, culture, and economy and relate them to the emergence of major regional differences. They learn about the challenges facing the new nation, with an emphasis on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War. They make connections between the rise of industrialization and contemporary social and economic conditions.

Coding

An introduction to the concept of logic and objects that governs most of computer science. Usually catered to younger students, this fun and easy way of programming allows anyone to perform complex tasks usually reserved to more advanced languages. Almost all block programming software utilizes easy to understand interfaces with drag and drop simplicity—perfect for anyone seeking a good introduction to programming.

A relatively new programming language designed for beginning programmers and seasoned veterans alike. Python is a powerful fully-fledged computer language capable of anything from simple calculators to complex cloud-based databases. Python was invented with one thing in mind—readability. It is very easy to understand with most of its syntax written in plain English. Straightforward and streamlined, Python is an excellent programming language for all ages.

Some students can choose to have a multi concentration of hardware and software but the majority of beginners will require some practice with hardware design. This course will demonstrate how to write software to control interactive hardware with real world uses. It will also touch on basic circuit design which includes AC/DC power, resistors, capacitors, and LEDs.

Two of the most widely used programming languages. Both based on the industry standard C programming language, C++ and Java utilizes efficient and powerful data control that makes many modern technologies possible. Java’s flexibility allows it to run on most devices including smart phones, while C++ remains to be excellent choice for someone who needs fast and efficient programs. Student seeking to learn these languages will be presented with great challenges but the results are well worth the trouble.

This course goes in-depth with databases and search methods. Students will learn how to construct databases using advanced concepts such as nodes, switches, and queues. Students can choose Java, C++, or Python but a strong background in programming is required to fully understand this course. Students who complete this course can move on to basic software and mobile application design complete with graphical user interfaces (GUI).

Chinese

This course introduces the Pinyin chart. Students are exposed to a list of elementary vocabulary and beginning grammar. The class consists of daily conversation and listening practices. No previous experience required. (2hrs/class, 48 classes required)

Since this course enlarges the student’s Chinese vocabulary and furthers the student’s understanding of Chinese grammar, it is required that you take Level 1 Chinese before stepping into Level 2. We include listening practice with radio broadcasts and TV news. We practice composition by working on writing short paragraphs in Chinese, and more! (2hrs/class, 48 classes required)

The most advanced level of vocabulary and grammar will be presented. We will introduce idioms and popular slang words to catch up with your Chinese friends. Students are expected to complete whole articles or essays on their own after finishing this course. (2hrs/class, 48 classes required)

Korean

Students are exposed to a list of elementary vocabulary and beginning grammar. The class consists of daily conversation and listening practices. No previous experience required. (2hrs/class, 48 classes required)

Since this course enlarges the student’s Korean vocabulary and furthers the student’s understanding of Korean grammar, it is required that you take Level 1 Korean before stepping into Level 2. We include listening practice with radio broadcasts and TV news. We practice composition by working on writing short paragraphs in Korean, and more! (2hrs/class, 48 classes required)

The most advanced level of vocabulary and grammar will be presented. We will introduce idioms and popular slang words to catch up with your Korean friends. Students are expected to complete whole articles or essays on their own after finishing this course. (2hrs/class, 48 classes required)


e-Learning Program

We have launched an online program to help students of all ages work on vocabulary and reading comprehension from the comfort of their own homes and on their own schedules. Choose from many popular titles as well as fantastic children’s classics and Greek and Roman myths. For more information, please read our blog and check out our e-Learning website.

Read our step-by-step e-Learning manual here.


Piano Lessons and Special Discount



Optimus offers 30-minute (1:1 private lessons) piano lessons twice a week. Classes are only $120/month (Level 1,2,3) and $150 (Level 4,5,6) and textbooks are included with your tuition. In addition, you have the added benefit of convenience: no more driving your child from one program to another because we have both music and homeschooling here at Optimus! For more information, please read our blog.

* We also offer a special discount for our piano classes. Get one month FREE when you pay for 11 months!

The first level provides students an easy, fun, and informative introduction to both music theory and piano technique. Essential topics such as western key names, rhythms, and basic music notation are covered. All students will get a feel for the class, increasing their confidence to tackle the following levels. (3 months)

Students who gain the knowledge and confidence now work on a deeper understanding of music. Every class is still very manageable but builds upon fundamental concepts such as scales and key signatures. (3 months)

This third iteration is last of the introductory levels which solidify the groundwork that is required for intermediate concepts. It completes the necessary comprehension for basic piano technique and musical competence. Topics such as major scales and intervals are included. (3 months)

The fourth level marks the beginning of intermediate practices. It emphasizes performances and technique over musical theory. Students are challenged to perform sight and ear training and make their way to good piano playing proficiency. (3 months)

This following level tests the student's skills with music theory and performances. At this point, students must be able to transpose musical pieces up or down in pitch by a constant interval. Sight reading is a general requirement for this level as it highlights critical piano techniques. (3 months)

The last level before advance teaches students independency through musical vocabulary. Students are guided and encouraged to write their melodies and tunes. Finally, students are taught to recognize enharmonical differences with notes such as sharps and flats. (3 months)


Violin Lessons and Special Discount



Optimus offers 1 hour (1:1 private lessons) violin lessons once a week. Classes are only $160/month and textbooks are included with your tuition. In addition, you have the added benefit of convenience: no more driving your child to one place for the After School program and then another for music lessons because we have both here at Optimus!

* We also offer a special discount for our piano classes. Get one month FREE when you pay for 11 months!

In this course, students will learn proper posture when playing the violin. They will be able to hold the bow properly and well and learn how to bow clearly and smoothly on open strings. In addition, they will learn how to play using half bows and whole bows and will learn the proper finger positions on each string. Last, they will learn how to read and play songs using two or more strings and fingers.

In this course, students will practice sight reading, intonation and bowing clearly and smoothly. They will learn all the finger positions (using all 4 fingers) for playing songs. They will also learn bowing techniques such as legato, slurs, détaché, and staccato.

In this course, students will sharpen their skills in playing with all four fingers on all 4 strings. They will also learn how to play first through third position with shifting, as well as double stops with one to two fingers. When playing, they will be introduced to playing vibrato on long notes, as well as music dynamics (crescendo and diminuendo). They will learn bowing techniques such as spiccato, sautille and martele. They will begin developing musical expression while playing through phrasing and dynamics.

In this course, students will sharpen their skills in playing first through third position with shifting and playing a smooth and continuous vibrato. They will learn and review bowing techniques such as martele, spiccato, sautille, colle. In addition, they will continue practicing double stops with two fingers and continue to develop their sense for tonal beauty by practicing expressive playing including rubato, dynamics and vibrato.

In this course, students will learn how to play first through fifth position with shifting. They will practice double stops with both fingers and learn complex bowing techniques, such as ricochet and longer, up-bow staccato. Their repertoire will explore all major, minor keys and simple modality and the student should demonstrate proficiency in the skills introduced in previous levels.


Enrichment Classes

Students can take a variety of classes at OLS. Students can take one or multiple of the classes we offer. For a list of available classes please click here.


Student Academic Progress Check

At Optimus, we believe that monitoring a student's performance enables us to provide the student the best academic support and guidance. For our new students, we use our enrollment procedure in order to give the student the best experience at Optimus. Once a student has joined Optimus, we collect their previous school year report card and state test to see where they are struggling and where they are excelling. After that, we have the student take our assessment test to get a better idea of the best strategy to get that student the best quality education. Once a student has started classes, we use our academic progress check in order for our staff to monitor the student as they attend Optimus in a variety of ways.

Each Optimus teacher is required to complete daily comments regarding each student's academics and their behavior during class. Their teacher will state a student’s academic progress by marking whether they are struggling, doing well, or excellent. If the teacher marks the student as struggling, they are required to state how they are struggling, how they were helped, and what more can be done to help the student improve. Our teachers are also required to identify their student’s behavior by marking unsatisfactory, satisfactory, or excellent. If the teacher marks their behavior as unsatisfactory, they must write a comment stating what the student did in order to have that status. Marking the student’s academic progress and behavior daily will help to catch small problems before they can become bigger and affect their academic growth.

Each teacher gives a student homework for every class they attend at Optimus. We know that our parents’ main concern is to make sure their child’s homework is completed and checked correctly. In order to notify our parents the status of completion on their student’s homework, the teacher is required to either mark finished, incomplete, or no homework. If the teacher has marked their homework as finished, this means that the homework has been finished, checked by the teacher, and corrected. If the teacher has marked the homework as incomplete, the teacher must write a comment on why the homework was not completed in their daily comment. This daily homework check allows us to monitor their homework status and make sure we know what is exactly going on in the classroom at all times. If a student receives a homework grade lower than a 70%, the teacher must write a comment on why their student received a lower grade and how they can help them rectify this problem in the future. This system will help our teachers truly know what is going on and how to help their students more efficiently.

Before a student enrolls in our program, they are requested to complete an assessment test. These assessment tests use test questions from the California state test testing them on two subjects, English-Language Arts and Math. Once a student enrolls in our program, we also make sure that they take an assessment test after every quarter as an additional measure to track their academic progress. The second time they take the assessment, they will take the same grade to see if they improved from the previous test. After the second quarter, they will take the next grade’s test to see how they are doing in their grade and after the third quarter, they will repeat that test. This data will help us further pinpoint our students’ areas of strengths and areas of weaknesses.

Sarah's Quarterly Assessment Test Schedule
Test Date Test Level
March 2019: While in 4th grade 4th grade test (1st time)
June 2019: After finishing 4th grade 4th grade test (2nd time)
September 2019: Starting 5th grade 4th grade test (3rd time)
December 2019: While in 5th grade 4th grade test (4th time)
March 2020: While in 5th grade 5th grade test (1st time)
June 2020: After finishing 5th grade 5th grade test (2nd time)
September 2020: Starting 6th grade 5th grade test (3rd time)
December 2020: While in 6th grade 5th grade test (4th time)

At Optimus, we understand that communication between our staff and parents is an important factor in order to maintain a student's academic progress. Therefore, we have implemented a quarterly parent meeting to establish each student's academic plan. We have many ways of monitoring our student’s progress; however, without any verbal communication, a student could fall through the cracks and not get all the help he or she needs to improve. We use this quarterly parent meeting to further indicate our comments and concerns to a student’s parent in order to make sure we are doing everything possible for our students.


Teacher Evaluation

Teachers receive formal performance evaluations from the Director at the end of each quarter. There are four general factors that go into evaluating a teacher; all four are important. Throughout the quarter, the Assistant Director will observe each teacher three separate times. The first two observations are unplanned (one is in-class and the other is through the audio/video camera) and the third is planned. For each observation, one Observation Form is filled out, each observation is 10% and together they make up 30% of your evaluation score. A weekly student grade check is filled out by teachers every week and make up 30% of the evaluation score. Also, Student/Parent Feedback is filled out by parents on the last week of each quarter and make up 20% of the evaluation score. The Director fills out an Intangibles Forms for all teachers, which make up the final 20% of the evaluation total.

The observation form goes into detail about lesson preparation, style and presentation, interpersonal dynamics, class management, and the overall impression of the class. The student/parent feedback and intangibles forms; however, are simpler and provide general feedback.

* All forms use a 1-5 scoring scale and teachers should have a score of 4.0 (equivalent to 80%) or more, which indicates that a teacher is performing well. The base scale is 3.5, which is the score all teachers are started with.

30% 30% 20% 20%
Class Observations
(scored by the Assistant Director each month)
Weekly Student Performance
(affected by scores on English and Math tests/projects)
Student/Parent Feedback
(from Parent Opinion Questionnaires completed quarterly)
Intangibles
(scored by the Director periodically throughout the quarter)

Each teacher will be observed once per month for a total of 3 observations per quarter. For teachers that teach more than one type of class, the Assistant Director will try to observe as many types as possible. The observation form will be used each time. For any items that are not observable in that class (i.e. Assistant Director didn’t stay long enough to see it that day, that doesn’t happen in that type of class, etc.), the item will not be scored and will not count towards that evaluation.

Based on the student’s most recent report card, the student will be given a “baseline percentage.” For example, if Student 1 had a B in English on their most recent report card, that student will have a baseline percentage of 80% for English. If Student 1 had a C in Math, they will have a baseline percentage of 70% for Math. Once baseline percentages have been established for the quarter, the teacher will need to enter student data each week for each subject. Scores students get on tests in those two subjects will affect the performance percentage. Quarterly, a student’s achievement scores will be averaged together (Weeks 1-12). This averaged percentage will be compared to the student's baseline percentage from the start of the quarter. Averaged percentages above the original baseline percentage will be rewarded with higher evaluation scores for the teacher, whereas averaged percentages below the original baseline percentage will receive unsatisfactory evaluation scores. At the end of the quarter (or ongoing) the teacher evaluation point value can be calculated based on the amount that the student’s performance has improved or gone down from the baseline percentage. If Student 1 finished the quarter with an English performance percentage of 80% (the same as the baseline percentage), the teacher would receive a score of 3.5 for that portion of the evaluation. If Student 1 finished the quarter with an English performance percentage of 90%, the teacher would receive a score of 4.5 for that portion of the evaluation.

Progress 15% 14% 13% 12% 11% 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% Base
5.0 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5

Progress -15% -14% -13% -12% -11% -10% -9% -8% -7% -6% -5% -4% -3% -2% -1% Base
2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5

Each quarter, parents will be asked to fill out a Parent Opinion Questionnaire (P.O.Q) that asks them to agree or disagree with a series of statements about their child’s teacher and the education they are receiving at Optimus. The P.O.Q also includes a number of short-response questions for which parents can provide specific feedback. Parents with more than one child in the program (or a child taking class with more than one teacher) will need to fill out one P.O.Q for EACH teacher. There are two different forms of the P.O.Q, one for students enrolled in the Afterschool Program and one for students taking enrichment classes.

Periodically throughout the quarter, the Director will be checking certain aspects of a teacher’s performance. These can include punctuality, walkie-talkie response, daily comments, e-mailing student performance, parent complaints/emailed HW pictures, etc. Each time an item is checked, a “grade” will be recorded for the teacher’s performance in that area. At the end of the quarter, the Director will be able to review the grades given to the teacher for each intangible item along with the date each grade was given. A score will be determined from that.


Payment Policies

No Registration Fee & Refund

It is common policy at most learning centers to charge a registration fee upon signing up your son or daughter. At Optimus, we believe the quality of our services speaks for themselves, and we see no need to charge you a nonrefundable, upfront fee. We pride ourselves on the fact that our clients can test our services with no financial obligation. To take it even one step further, if at any point you are unsatisfied with our service, you can discontinue your student’s enrollment at Optimus and receive a prorated refund with only two weeks’ notice. However, refunds are not applicable to students who are enrolled in our Summer Program or our monthly classes (i.e. book club class, enrichment class).

Multiple Sibling Discount

While every parent, of course, wants the best for all of their children, we know that the financial burden of sending all of your little learners to an homeschool program at the same time can become substantial. At Optimus, we are willing to shoulder some of that burden for you. We welcome and encourage you to bring all of your children by offering a 10% discount on your second child’s tuition and a 15% discount on your third child’s tuition. These discounts will be applied to the lesser amount. Do you have even more than three children? No problem! Arrange a meeting with the director and we will handle your situation personally!

Military Discount

Optimus thanks the American troops for all they do! To show our appreciation and support, all active-duty military members receive a 5% discount on their child’s tuition!

* Not valid with other discounts.

Cancellation

Many learning centers and tutoring programs require students to sign an enrollment contract. At Optimus Learning School, we do not have enrollment contracts. However, we do require that you provide us notice when you decide that your child will no longer be attending Optimus. Please give notice in writing or in-person to the Assistant Director by the 15th of the month prior. If we are not provided notice, you will be subject to pay up to 1 month of tuition to cover the costs we incur as a result of late notice. If you decide not to pay, your account will be referred to a third-party collection agency. This cancellation policy applies to all classes (i.e., group, private, enrichment) and our homeschool program.